"Tune in Philadelphia" is a collection of photographs by Michael Penn depicting 75 rooftop antenna images. Arranged into a series of three typologies, these images ask the question - how do we honor when a technology's through?

After recognizing the decline of analog signal receivers, Penn became fasinated by the idea of these useless,  twisted metal sculptures remaining in place for no reason other than human laziness.

Future generations will never experience static interference, or "snow." When a signal is lost in the new digital age, it just goes off. At most, a pixeled glitch of residual imagery is left smeared on the screen - until the signal returns minutes later. Gone are the days of VHF, UHF, and watching reruns through what looks like a dust storm. When these antennas finally receive their last broadast, how will we remember them?

168 pages. Hardcover.

About the Artist:
Michael Penn is a Philadelphia-based street photographer. He is known for his high-contrast black and white works. Inspired by the Japanese Provoke Movement, Penn's street photography projects include the 1000-photo collection "The Philadelphia Project," Out of New York," "Lonely New York," "Month-Day-Year," "Graffiti Pier," and "Welcome to Market East."